Drivers in Arizona may make a false move and involve themselves in a rollover crash. Rollovers are typically violent, and the ways they arise can be complicated since they normally have to do with drivers’ interaction with their car, the road and the environment.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that most rollover fatalities are the result of single-vehicle crashes. In addition, 90% of those vehicles in fatal rollovers are usually engaged in ordinary maneuvers at the time of the crash, like traveling on a straight road or turning a curve. This shows how crucial driver behavior is.

Speeding is one common factor in rollovers. In fact, it’s behind a higher percentage of fatal rollovers than of any other type of fatal car crash. Around 75% of fatal rollovers take place in areas where the posted speed limit is 55 mph or greater.

A second factor is alcohol. Even when drivers are not legally drunk, they may still experience the impairment of their attention span, their vision and muscle coordination. A third factor is vehicle type. While any car can be in a rollover, those with a higher center of gravity, such as SUVs and pickups, run a higher risk.

Rollovers can, of course, involve more than one vehicle. In such collisions, occupants of those other cars may incur catastrophic injuries that require lengthy periods of expensive medical care and treatment. In many cases, these victims are unable to return to work during their recovery period, if ever. They might want to have the assistance of an attorney when pursuing compensation for these and other losses.